Western Crops Day brings producers from area

The Armory was full of producers interested in finding out the year had gone as the 30th annual Western Dakota Crops Day research report was released, and speakers from around the state spoke about different products.   

JAMIE SPAINHOWER/ADAMS COUNTY RECORD John  Rickertsen, Research agronomist at the Hettinger Research Extension Center speaks at the annual crops day.
JAMIE SPAINHOWER/ADAMS COUNTY RECORD
John Rickertsen, Research agronomist at the Hettinger Research Extension Center speaks at the annual crops day.

By Jamie Spainhower

Adams County Editor

 

The Armory was full of producers interested in finding out the year had gone as the 30th annual Western Dakota Crops Day research report was released, and speakers from around the state spoke about different products.   NDSU passed out the report for 2013 and explained some of the projects they have been working on.

One thing most of the speakers touched on was no till, and how much it has changed the farming landscape.

“Most producers have moved to no till,” said Dr. Pat Carr, of the Dickinson Research Extension Center.

By not turning the ground under, it helps retain moisture and nutrients that otherwise could be blown away, as the keeps the soil where it needs to be – in the field.

No till also has shown to increase crop yield after moving away from clean till. By rotating crops, research shows a significant jump in the bushel amount and weight.

Also discussed were various herbicides, nutrients and fertilizers and when and how much needs to be added during the growing cycle.

Various vendors were also in attendance, talking with farmers about their products and how they can help them with their crops.

 







GAMES