Hallucinogenic Mushrooms Found in Reeder

magic-mushrooms

The Adams County Sheriff’s Department confirmed that there was an arrest made in Reeder on July 16, 2014, for the possession of hallucinogenic, psilocybin mushrooms with an intent to distribute.

By JENNIFER GARREAU

Record Editor

 

The Adams County Sheriff’s Department confirmed that there was an arrest made in Reeder on July 16, 2014, for the possession of hallucinogenic, psilocybin mushrooms with an intent to distribute.

“We cannot comment on the case as it is still under investigation,” said Adams County Sheriff, Travis Collins. “Every area of the state has its drug problems, it’s not just here but state wide.”

Psilocybin mushrooms are fungi that contain psychoactive indole alkaloids. There are multiple names for the mushrooms, the most commonly used names are shrooms and magic mushrooms. Psilocybin mushrooms have likely been used since prehistoric times and may have been depicted in rock art. Native American cultures have used these mushrooms in religious rites. In today’s modern society they are used recreationally for their psychedelic effects.

Psilocybin and psilocin are listed as Schedule I drugs under the United Nations 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. Schedule I drugs are deemed to have a high potential for abuse and are not recognized for medical use.

State’s Attorney, Aaron Roseland, also refused to comment on the case, but said he has seen more drug cases in Adams County, since 2009. “We have seen a rash of synthetic drug cases, methamphetamines, marijuana, mushrooms, heroin and even cocaine,” he said. He attributes this to being just outside the oil impacted area of the state. “There are many new people in Hettinger and I see several new faces around, which may be because of the additional traffic through town due to the oil impacted counties of the state,” Roseland said.

On July 15th, Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem, released the 2013 North Dakota crime statistics, in which the largest area of concern was the increased number of drug cases which increases 19.5% since 2012.

Stenehjem reports that the state’s crime rate of 2168.3 per 100,000 population is one of the lowest in the nation. Total crime increased by 5.5% from 2012. Violent crimes were 9.9% of the total crimes reported by law enforcement. Stenehjem reports that this percentage has remained fairly steady for the past six years. When adjusted for the transient oil population, the state’s crime rate drops to 2040 per 100,000 population.

“Arrests for drug offenses increased 19.5 percent from a 2012 total of 2,872 to 3,431 in 2013. According to the Attorney General’s Status and Trends report, issued earlier this month, the number of methamphetamine samples submitted to the crime laboratory increased by 52% last year, from 1,644 in 2012 to 2,503 in 2013. In 2013, 38% of the drug cases handled by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation involved meth,” stated the report.

U.S. Senator John Hoeven, has recently been working with the Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michelle Leonhart, to secure additional support for western North Dakota’s drug enforcement efforts.

“It’s critical that the DEA dedicate sufficient staff, both fulltime and on an as-needed basis, to help fight drug crimes,” Hoeven said. “This includes assigning DEA agents to local narcotic taskforces in western North Dakota and providing more agency support. I urged Administrator Leonhart to work with local and state officials to get DEA agents into the field as soon as possible.”

Leonhart reports that her administrations is taking several steps to assist North Dakota law enforcement efforts including scheduling two training session in the state to be held the last two weeks of Aug., and appointing 40 temporary DEA agents to western North Dakota, since Oct. of 2013, to assist local law enforcement.