Grand River Roundup

We got .65 hundredths of rain this week and it cooled down a little – no triple digits temps this week, but more wind than we wanted.

Betty Olson COLUMN BOX 2We got .65 hundredths of rain this week and it cooled down a little – no triple digits temps this week, but more wind than we wanted. The thunderstorm Tuesday brought most of the rain and the nasty wind that night did some damage to Amanda’s garden and blew down several dead tree branches.

The weather was nice Monday when we vaccinated the calves and poured on the cows at our Horse Creek pasture. Missy went with the guys to help and I took dinner up there at noon. They missed some calves while they were gathering so they had to put off lunch to find and work them before we ate. We had a couple sick calves so Reub and I went to Bill Holt’s to borrow some Draxxin to doctor them. We didn’t eat until 2:00, but no one starved. After we got home that afternoon, they worked the cows and calves up west.

Lance Giannonatti flew over our sheep Tuesday and shot a coyote hanging out with them. Taz went with Amanda for her doctor appointment in Spearfish and then he flew out of Rapid City to join his cowboy buddies rodeoing over on the west coast.

Tuesday evening we had the regional meeting of the Great Western Cattle Trail Association in Spearfish with folks from North and South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming. David Burell, the founder of the GWCTA, came up from Bandera, Texas after attending the national GWCTA meeting in Dodge City, Kan. He’s trying to get active chapters set up in North Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming and there is a lot of interest in all three states.

The South Dakota chapter even picked up a new member that evening.

Chuck Turbiville is the Mayor of Deadwood and was recently re-elected to the House of Representatives from District 31. Chuck, like every other Turbiville in this area, is a descendant of Pecos Dick Turbiville who came up from Texas with the cattle herds in the late 1800s and made South Dakota his home. We are blessed with a lot of folks in this area who can trace their lineage back to cowboys that came up the Great Western Cattle Trail and we will gladly welcome you into our organization if you’re interested.

Wednesday these guys worked the cows and calves over at Glendo. Missy didn’t have to go to work because of the bike rally, so I only cooked lunch for Reub and me. Reub’s cousin Lance Olson called that morning and he and Marilyn are planning to come out from Great Falls, Montana to visit relatives and old friends around Buffalo next week. We’re sure looking forward to seeing them!

Lance and his brothers, Cliff and Tad, grew up in Buffalo where their parents, Check and Virginia (Lenerville) Olson ran the Dutch Room and the Oasis. Check also worked for Peterson Implement in Buffalo and is buried in the Buffalo Cemetery.

We have a new resident in Harding County! Tristan Howard Jensen was born Wednesday, August 10 in Rapid City to Alicia and Chad Jensen. The little guy weighed in at 9lbs 4oz and is 21 inches long. He is named after his grandpa Howard Jensen, one of my favorite people.

We lost a wonderful man on Thursday. Merle Kopren, 86, passed away Thursday at the Sturgis Regional Hospital. Merle’s memorial service will be held at Grace Lutheran Church on Friday. Inurnment, with military honors, will follow at Black Hills National Cemetery. Merle was married to my cousin Jean John and they have four really sweet kids, Merlene (Dale) Palczewski, Willis (Cindy) Kopren, Debra (Terry) McPherson and Ross (Beverly) Kopren.

Slim Buttes Lutheran had their annual campout Saturday night at Reva Gap with church Sunday morning. We didn’t make it down to campout, but we enjoyed getting together with everyone for the church service and brunch at the Gap afterwards.

Friday, Casey shot another coyote over by the sheep not far from the one Lance Giannonatti killed on Monday. In ranch country, we look at predators a little differently than some of the more liberal states do, which reminded me of this story a friend sent me a while back:

California

The Governor of California is jogging with his dog along a nature trail. A coyote jumps out and attacks the Governor’s dog, then bites the Governor.

The Governor starts to intervene, but reflects upon the movie, “Bambi,” and then realizes he should stop because the coyote is only doing what is natural.

He calls Animal Control. Animal Control captures the coyote and bills the state $200, testing it for diseases, and $500 for relocating it.

He calls a veterinarian. The vet collects the dead dog and bills the state $200, testing it for diseases.

Governor Moonbeam goes to the hospital and spends $9,500 getting checked for diseases from the coyote and getting his bite wound bandaged.

The running trail gets shut down for 6 months while Fish & Game conducts a $100,000 survey to make sure the area is now free of dangerous animals.

The Governor spends $75,000 in state funds implementing a “coyote awareness program” for residents of the area.

The State Legislature spends $2 million to study how to better treat rabies and how to permanently eradicate the disease throughout the world.

The Governor’s security agent is fired for not stopping the attack.

The state spends $150,000 to hire and train a new agent with additional special training re: the nature of coyotes.

PETA protests the coyote’s relocation and files a $5 million suit against the state.

Texas

The Governor of Texas is jogging with his dog along a nature trail. A coyote jumps out and attacks his dog.

The Governor shoots the coyote with his state-issued pistol and keeps jogging. The Governor has spent $.50 on a .45 ACP hollow point cartridge.

The buzzards eat the dead coyote.

And that, my friends, is one of the reasons California is broke and Texas is not.

Betty Olson is a South Dakota rancher and state legislator for District 28.







GAMES