Doctor with area ties wins humanitarian award

The recent recipient of a Distinguished Humanitarian Award, Dr. Sheldon Braaten has committed the last 45 years to helping children become the best version of themselves.

Braaten
Braaten

The recent recipient of a Distinguished Humanitarian Award, Dr. Sheldon Braaten has committed the last 45 years to helping children become the best version of themselves.  A recognized leader in behavioral psychology in Little Canada, Minn., he utilizes research-based learning theories to help other professionals serving troubled children to help them to modify their behavior, to treat anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse, and mental illness.  By addressing the behaviors that exacerbate these types of disorders, Dr. Braaten is able to teach children and adolescents techniques to alter their responses and come through the other side positively.  Dr. Braaten currently serves as the executive director of the Behavioral Institute for Children and Adolescents, where he provides training and resources for parents, educators, and mental and behavioral health care providers who serve children and adolescents nationwide.  In this role, he advocates for, designs and evaluates behavioral programs according to the needs of struggling children and youths.  He offers customized training in the areas of aggression, assessment, behavioral-emotional assessment, functional behavioral assessment, behavioral reduction strategies, intervention plans, and program development for emotional behavioral disorders.

Dr.  Braaten is a BICA trainer on the topics of anger management for kids, behavioral objective sequence, social skills training and aggression replacement techniques (START), and strategies and techniques for aggression intervention and replacement skills (STAIRS).  He holds a Ph.D. in special education and educational administration from the University of Minnesota, a Master of Arts in special education, and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Augustana College.  Dr. Braaten also completed certifications in social studies (7-12) and emotionally disturbed behaviors (K-12), as well as achieved the qualifications necessary to be distinguished as a supervisor of special education and director of special education.

Motivated by his desire to help children thrive, Dr. Braaten is committed to ongoing education and professional development.  To that end, he is actively involved with industry organizations like the Council for Exceptional Children, Council for Children with Behavior Disorders, and Minnesota council for Children with Behavioral Disorders, and is a past member of Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the Correctional Education Association, Association for Behavior Analysis International, and Council for Educational Diagnostic Services.  Looking to the future, Dr. Braaten intends to continue offering cognitive behavioral services to children and adolescents throughout Minnesota.







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