Cleanup underway in Bucyrus

On the surface it sounds like a routine city cleanup. But the work that has been done in Bucyrus has really impacted the way the little town west of Hettinger looks right now.

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By COLE BENZ | Record Editor
cbenz@countrymedia.net

On the surface it sounds like a routine city cleanup. But the work that has been done in Bucyrus has really impacted the way the little town west of Hettinger looks right now.

“When I talk about it, it doesn’t seem like much,” Bucurys City Auditor Mary Rowley said. “But some of the residence have been very unhappy about this for years and years. Suddenly we got together and got going on it.”

Initiated by the city, two individuals have been integral to the cleanup work in town, according to Rowley. Ardella Dschaak and Theresa Hunter have spearheaded the movement.

The cleanup started with the growing grass.

“The first thing we got people to do is cut grass,” Rowley said.

The other big tasks was removing much of the fallen branches and dead trees. Some trees killed or damaged from the fire a few years ago were still present. But Rowley said that some of the dead vegetation was not necessarily from the fire, but from old age or weathering.

The group went from lot to lot, and encouraged the owners to clean up their properties, and since they started the movement in May, they have received a great deal of support from the residents.

“We haven’t met really any stiff resistance,” Rowley said.

Rowley said the city also contacted the Southwest District Health Department and had someone come down to inspect a few of the empty buildings in town. Some of which have been unoccupied for 50 years, according to Rowley.

The representative examined the structures and decided they must come down. So far three of the four buildings have been torn down, and one owner filled in a basement with dirt so no one wandering would fall and get injured.

To date, the cleanup has been owner-driven, and the city hasn’t spent any money, according to Rowley. It has been a long time in the making, and though it is seems like minor updates, the towns people can already see a difference, Rowley said.

“Some of the residence have been very unhappy about this for years and years. Suddenly we got together and got going on it,” she said. “The people living there can certainly see a big difference.”







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