Historic trail marker to get monument near historic courthouse

The historical pathway the Yellowstone Trail took to cross the nation ran right through Hettinger and Adams County. The yellow, stone markers (original to the trail), can be seen throughout the communities of the county, coming very close to the original path the trail took.

An artist’s rendering of what the prospective monument will look like outside of Adams County Courthouse and Adams County Sheriff’s Department. The top portion is a side view, while the bottom portion is an arial view. (Courtesy)
An artist’s rendering of what the prospective monument will look like outside of Adams County Courthouse and Adams County Sheriff’s Department. The top portion is a side view, while the bottom portion is an arial view. (Courtesy)

By COLE BENZ | Record Editor
cbenz@countrymedia.net

The historical pathway the Yellowstone Trail took to cross the nation ran right through Hettinger and Adams County. The yellow, stone markers (original to the trail), can be seen throughout the communities of the county, coming very close to the original path the trail took.

Recently one of those markers was relocated, temporarily, until a more suitable monument can be built to honor the history behind the trail. The marker that was placed just outside of the C & N Cafe was recently removed on Oct. 25 and temporarily housed at the Dakota Buttes Museum in Hettinger.

Multiple groups have collaborated in an effort to construct an area where that marker will finally rest. Dakota Buttes Visitors Council, Dakota Buttes Museum, Adams County Development Corporation, Beauty of Hettinger with the support of the Adams County Commissioners have joined forces to accomplish one goal, giving the marker (and the historic trail), the recognition they believe it deserves.

Allen McIntyre, one of the contributors to the project, said that the county commissioners have given them permission to construct an area near the Adams County Sheriff’s department, on the corner of Adams Avenue and 7th Street North. He said that the designated area will have some landscaping to make it attractive, as well as included some informational plaques to read about the trail. There will also be some space to recognize another historical spot in Hettinger.

“To recognize it and get some history, there will be a couple of plaques there, and one will explain the Yellowstone Trail marker and the other one will recognize the adams county courthouse [as a historical site],” McIntyre said.

McIntyre, representing the Beauty of Hettinger, said that it’s early on in the process and there’s still a lot of work to be done, but believes in the conglomerate of the group.

“We finally put various organizations together,” McIntyre said. “We’ve got a pretty strong group together.”

He said the group could eventually fundraise for the venture, but they won’t consider seeking money until a project cost is decided.

“We don’t have a price tag on it yet,” McIntyre said.

He said a hurdle they have yet to jump over is the handicap access to the monument, that will be a large part of determining the cost of the project.

The group has commissioned a sketch of the prospective project. Dan Boxrud, of The Graphic Attic in Hettinger drew out what the space could look like when it’s completed.

McIntyre told The Record that he hoped the project would be finished within the next year.